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  • Writer's pictureCole Shope

Breakdown of Each Army Officer Branch


There are many reasons why someone might choose to join the military as an officer, including:

  1. Leadership opportunities: As an officer, you will have the opportunity to lead and manage a team of soldiers, which can be a rewarding experience.

  2. Job security: Military officers typically have job security and good benefits, including healthcare, retirement, and education opportunities.

  3. Personal growth: The military provides many opportunities for personal growth, including training and leadership development programs.

  4. Sense of purpose: Many people find a sense of purpose and fulfillment in serving their country and making a difference in the world.

  5. Career advancement: The military can provide opportunities for career advancement and the opportunity to learn new skills.

  6. Travel: Military officers have the opportunity to travel and see new places, both domestically and internationally.

If you have made it this far, you already respect the many benefits of joining as an Officer. What you may be wondering is - what exactly to Army Officers do? Well, I cover that in a video here, but in this article I want to break down what different career paths you can follow as an officer.


First, don't be confused by the term "Branch". The Army is a branch of the United States Military, but Officer jobs/careers are broken down into branches as well. I have listed them below.


Combat Arms: Branches directly involved in engaging an enemy.


Infantry - The infantry is the main fighting force of the military, and is responsible for engaging in ground combat with the enemy. They are trained to fight on foot, and use a variety of weapons, including rifles, machine guns, and grenades. As an Officer you will lead these brave men and women.





Air Defense Artillery - Air Defense Artillery (ADA) is a branch of the military that is responsible for protecting against enemy aircraft and missiles. ADA units use a variety of weapons and equipment to detect, track, and engage incoming aircraft and missiles. This includes radar systems, anti-aircraft guns, and surface-to-air missiles.

ADA units are designed to protect ground troops, as well as strategic assets such as airfields, cities, and key infrastructure. They provide protection against a variety of threats, including manned aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and cruise missiles.







Armor - The Armor branch of the army is responsible for operating tanks and other armored fighting vehicles (AFVs). Armor units provide mobile firepower and protection for the ground combat forces. They are trained to engage in direct combat with the enemy, and are typically equipped with a variety of weapons, including tanks, armored personnel carriers (APCs), and self-propelled artillery.

Armor officers are responsible for leading and managing Armor units, and are trained to operate and maintain the various types of armored vehicles and equipment. They also receive training in tactics, logistics, and leadership.





Aviation - The Aviation branch of the army is responsible for providing air support to the ground combat forces. Army aviation units operate a variety of aircraft, including helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, for a variety of missions such as reconnaissance, transportation, and attack.


Aviation officers are responsible for leading and managing aviation units, and are trained to operate and maintain the various types of aircraft used by the army. They also receive training in tactics, logistics, and leadership.

Army Aviation units typically provide a range of capabilities to the ground combat forces, such as reconnaissance, transportation, medevac, and more.





Corps of Engineers - The Corps of Engineers is a branch of the U.S. Army that is responsible for a wide range of engineering and construction projects. The Corps of Engineers provides vital engineering and construction services to the U.S. military, as well as to civilian agencies and local communities.


The Corps of Engineers has several primary functions:

  1. Military Construction

  2. Infrastructure

  3. Environmental Stewardship

  4. Emergency Response

  5. Research and Development

The Corps of Engineers is composed of both civilian employees and soldiers, and it is a key part of the U.S. Army, providing important services to the military, the government, and the public.





Field Artillery - Artillery units are responsible for providing indirect fire support to the infantry and armor units. They use large-caliber guns, howitzers, and missiles to attack targets at a distance.


Field artillery officers are responsible for leading and managing field artillery units, and are trained to operate and maintain the various types of artillery and missile systems used by the army. They also receive training in tactics, logistics, and leadership.


Field artillery units are often used in a variety of roles, including providing fire support to infantry and armor units, engaging in counter-battery fire against enemy artillery, and supporting air defense operations. They can also be used to provide precise, long-range fires in support of joint and coalition operations.





Special Forces - The Special Forces (SF) of the U.S. Army are a specialized branch that is trained to conduct a wide range of unique and specialized missions, such as reconnaissance, counterterrorism, and unconventional warfare. They are also known as the Green Berets, due to the distinctive headgear they wear.

Special Forces soldiers receive advanced training in a variety of areas, such as:

  • Small unit tactics

  • Foreign languages and cultures

  • Unconventional warfare

  • Direct action

  • Special reconnaissance

  • Counterterrorism

  • Personnel recovery

  • Information operations

  • Intelligence collection

Special Forces soldiers also receive training in advanced weapons, communications, and medical skills. They are expected to be experts in both guerrilla warfare and conventional warfare, and able to conduct a wide range of operations in austere and remote environments.






Combat Support: Branches tasked with supporting the combat units


Chemical Corps - The Chemical Corps of the U.S. Army is responsible for providing chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) defense capabilities to the army and other services. The Chemical Corps provides a wide range of capabilities, including detection, identification, protection, decontamination, and smoke generation.


The Chemical Corps is composed of soldiers and civilian employees who receive specialized training in CBRN defense. Chemical soldiers are trained to operate and maintain CBRN defense equipment, such as detectors and protective gear, and to respond to CBRN incidents. They also receive training in CBRN defense tactics, logistics, and leadership.





Signal Corps - The Signal Corps of the U.S. Army is responsible for providing communications and information systems support to the army and other services. The Signal Corps provides a wide range of capabilities, including voice and data communications, information systems, and network operations.


The Signal Corps is composed of soldiers and civilian employees who receive specialized training in communications and information systems. Signal soldiers are trained to operate and maintain a variety of communications and information systems, such as radios, satellite systems, and networks. They also receive training in communications and information systems tactics, logistics, and leadership.






Military Intelligence Corps - The Military Intelligence Corps of the U.S. Army is responsible for providing intelligence support to the army and other services. The Military Intelligence Corps provides a wide range of capabilities, including intelligence collection, analysis, and dissemination.


The Military Intelligence Corps is composed of soldiers and civilian employees who receive specialized training in intelligence. Military Intelligence soldiers are trained to collect, analyze, and disseminate intelligence information, using a variety of methods and technologies. They also receive training in intelligence tactics, logistics, and leadership.







Military Police Corps - The Military Police Corps is a branch of the United States Army that provides law enforcement and security services to the U.S. Army. Military police officers are responsible for maintaining law and order, protecting lives and property on Army installations, and enforcing military laws and regulations. They also provide support to combat operations by conducting battlefield circulation control, area security, and prisoner of war operations. Military police officers may also be called upon to provide support to civilian law enforcement agencies during emergencies or natural disasters.






Combat Service Support Branches: Large-scale Army logistics



Adjutant General's Corps - The Adjutant General's Corps (AG Corps) is a branch of the United States Army that provides administrative, personnel, and logistics support to the U.S. Army. The AG Corps is responsible for managing human resources, including recruiting, training, and personnel management, as well as providing legal support, financial management, and logistics support.


The Adjutant General (AG) is the senior officer who is responsible for the AG Corps and serves as the principal advisor to the Army's senior leadership on all matters related to personnel and logistics support.


The AG Corps includes officers and enlisted soldiers who serve in a variety of roles, including human resources specialists, legal administrators, financial management technicians, and logistics specialists. They are responsible for maintaining personnel records, processing pay and benefits, providing legal advice, and managing logistics operations such as supply and transportation.







Finance Corps - The Finance Corps of the United States Army is a staff corps (non-combat specialty branch) of the U.S. Army that provides financial management support to the Army and other Department of Defense (DOD) agencies. The primary mission of the Finance Corps is to provide financial management expertise in support of Army operations, including budgeting, accounting, financial analysis, and auditing.


Finance Corps officers are responsible for managing the Army's financial resources, including budgeting, accounting, financial analysis, and auditing. They provide financial advice to commanders and staffs, plan and execute financial operations, and ensure compliance with laws and regulations. They also provide financial services to soldiers, civilians, and their families, including pay and travel claims, and tax services.






Ordnance Corps - The Ordnance Corps of the United States Army is a staff corps of the U.S. Army that provides logistics support to the Army by providing equipment, ammunition, and other supplies to soldiers and units in the field. The primary mission of the Ordnance Corps is to provide maintenance, supply, and logistics support for weapons systems, vehicles, and equipment.


Ordnance Corps officers are responsible for managing the Army's logistics operations, including maintenance, supply, and transportation of equipment, weapons, and ammunition. They also manage the distribution and storage of supplies and equipment, and provide technical advice and assistance to commanders and staffs. They also ensure that equipment is properly maintained and in good working order.







Quartermaster Corps - The Quartermaster Corps of the United States Army is a staff corps of the U.S. Army that provides logistics support to the Army by providing supplies, services, and equipment to soldiers and units in the field. The primary mission of the Quartermaster Corps is to provide sustainment, supplies, and services to the Army and other Department of Defense (DOD) agencies.


Quartermaster Corps officers are responsible for managing the Army's logistics operations, including supply and distribution of food, fuel, and other supplies, as well as providing transportation and water supply support. They also manage the distribution and storage of supplies and equipment, and provide technical advice and assistance to commanders and staffs. They also ensure that equipment is properly maintained and in good working order.






Transportation Corps - The Transportation Corps of the United States Army is a staff corps of the U.S. Army that provides logistics support to the Army by providing transportation and mobility support to soldiers and units in the field. The primary mission of the Transportation Corps is to provide transportation and distribution management, as well as provide transportation support to other U.S. government agencies, and to support humanitarian and disaster relief operations.







Special: Branches where higher education is typically required


Judge Advocate Generals Corps (JAG) - The Judge Advocate General's Corps (JAG Corps) is a staff corps of the United States Army that provides legal support to the U.S. Army. The JAG Corps is responsible for providing legal advice and representation to commanders, soldiers, and their families on a wide range of legal matters.


JAG Corps officers, also known as Judge Advocates, are responsible for providing legal advice to commanders and staffs on a wide range of legal issues, including military justice, administrative law, contract law, and international law. They also serve as prosecutors and defense counsel in courts-martial, as well as providing legal representation in administrative proceedings and other legal proceedings. Additionally, JAG Corps officers provide legal assistance to soldiers and their families on personal legal matters such as wills, powers of attorney, and consumer protection.





Chaplain Corps - The Chaplain Corps of the United States Army is a staff corps of the U.S. Army that provides spiritual and religious support to soldiers, their families, and civilian employees of the Army. The primary mission of the Chaplain Corps is to provide spiritual and moral guidance to soldiers, regardless of their faith or belief system.


Army chaplains are ordained or endorsed by their respective faith groups and are responsible for providing religious and spiritual support to soldiers, including offering counseling, conducting religious services and sacraments, and providing pastoral care. They also serve as advisors to commanders on issues related to the religious and spiritual well-being of soldiers and their families.






Medical Corps - The Medical Corps of the United States Army is a staff corps of the U.S. Army that provides medical and healthcare support to soldiers, their families, and veterans. The primary mission of the Medical Corps is to provide medical care and services to soldiers, military families, and veterans, and to support the combat readiness of the Army.


Medical Corps officers are medical doctors (MDs) or doctors of osteopathy (DOs) who are responsible for providing medical care and treatment to soldiers, military families, and veterans. They also provide leadership and supervision to other medical personnel and support the research and development of new medical treatments and technologies.


The Medical Corps includes various specialties such as general practice, surgery, emergency medicine, psychiatry, and more. They work in a variety of settings such as in units, hospitals, and clinics both in the US and overseas. They also provide support during deployments and in contingency operations.






Dental Corps - The Dental Corps of the United States Army is a staff corps (non-combat specialty branch) of the U.S. Army that provides dental care and support to soldiers, their families, and veterans. The primary mission of the Dental Corps is to provide comprehensive dental care to soldiers, ensuring their readiness to carry out their military duties.


Dental Corps officers are dental doctors (DDS or DMD) who are responsible for providing dental care and treatment to soldiers, military families, and veterans. They also provide leadership and supervision to other dental personnel and support the research and development of new dental treatments and technologies.







Veterinary Corps - The Veterinary Corps of the United States Army is a staff corps (non-combat specialty branch) of the U.S. Army that provides veterinary care and support to military working animals, and food safety and defense support to the Army and other Department of Defense (DOD) agencies. The primary mission of the Veterinary Corps is to provide veterinary care and services to military working animals, ensuring their readiness to carry out their military duties, and to ensure the safety and quality of food supplies for soldiers and other military personnel.



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